Tag Archives: war on terror

I changed my mind

About going to bed. The BBC have just given me another look at the debate over the nuclear deterrant. And it sparked a thought.

First, a position statement; having said #iagreewithnick quite a lot lately, it’s interesting to discover I disagree with him on both nuclear questions. I suspect that nuclear power is going to play a part in bridging the energy gap, while we recover from 30 years of crass idiocy in ignoring the sustainability of our economy. I do not believe in the utility of nuclear weapons inside a biosphere. Nick disagrees with me on both counts. Interesting.

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Myth Factory

Broken Britain?

I’m not alone in noticing that the Economist are doing a good job of contrasting Conservative rhetoric with the data. The most significant bits of the article for me:

Chief among people’s worries is their security. Under Labour, fear of crime climbed until by 2007 it had become the issue that pollsters identified as the main complaint among voters. The heightened fears are a puzzle to criminologists, who point out that over the past 15 years Britain has experienced a steady, deep fall in crime. The statistics are notoriously hard to interpret, but according to the British Crime Survey, the Home Office’s most reliable measure though still far from perfect, crime overall has dropped by 45% since its peak in 1995. […] Violent crime has fallen too. It is now almost half what it was in 1995, and no higher than in 1981.

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JQP in Brief

Balls on the Back Benches

Not, unfortunately, Ed. Labour MP Graham Allen has written a very interesting post suggesting some out-of-the-box perspectives on British democracy. I agree with a considerable amount, if not all, of what he said but that’s not why I’m linking it. Continue reading

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JQP in Boxes

So, just after the house-move one of my full-time staff broke her leg, and is out for 6-12 weeks. So I’ve just done two weeks of most of her work as well as mine… and I’ve really had no reading time. Add to this a continuing state of internet fail at home, for reasons of BT, and I’m still on hiatus. Sorry…

In other news, really everyone needs to read this.

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JQP in Brief

Allies

It may prove a strategic error for the Cambridge PD to have shown their collective asses right at the start of Blog Against Racism week. It practically guaranteed them the spotlight as “offenders of the week” at a time when thousands of honourable people were looking for a bigot to pillory. On the other hand, I didn’t even know it was IBARW until Jennie Rigg mentioned it: hat duly tipped.

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JQP in Brief

Courting Public Opinion II: “Nyer nyer nah ner ner”

“I told you so!”

I did warn you, Ms. Harman. This, what you see around you? The slavering hacks of Wapping dragging all the senior members of your government through the Westminster Perp-walk, as people bay for your Prime Minister’s blood? This is the court of public opinion. This is what you turned loose on Fred the Shred; beating a man with the stable door has found you no horses. But nailing your trousers to the mast does make it very hard to climb down.

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Little Brother

JQP note: This article re-appears here by kind permission of the editors (one of whom is the Head Research Otter) over at PSUK, for whom it was originally written. I urge anyone concerned about the balance between citizen autonomy and state control to read and contribute to their project.


Sometimes, I wonder whether the human habit of gerontocracy can survive in a high-bandwidth society. Clearly, the experienced are better administrators than those who haven’t learned the hard way; not necessarily better policy makers, but certainly better administrators. But when Moore’s Law has taken over your world and the pace of change, particularly in the sphere of data generation, acquisition and analysis, has become so fast that the map can shift under the territory faster than you can draw, how can we ask people born before the fax machine to understand and legislate about technology?

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